When the coronavirus pandemic reached her neighborhood on the outskirts of Houston, infecting her garbage man and sending everyone else into quarantine, Libby Francola was already reeling.

She had just split with her boyfriend, reaching the end of her first serious relationship in five years. “I was not in a good place mentally, and coronavirus made it even harder,” Ms. Francola, 32, said. “I felt like I just didn’t have anyone to talk to about anything.”

Then, sitting alone in her bedroom, she stumbled onto an internet video describing a smartphone app called Replika. The app’s sole purpose, the video said, is to be her friend.

Ms. Francola was skeptical. But the app was free, and it offered what she needed most: conversation. She spent the day chatting with the app via text messages — mostly about her problems, hopes and anxieties. The next day, she paid an $8 monthly fee so she could actually talk with it, as if she were chatting with someone on the telephone.

“In a weird way, it was therapeutic,” said Ms. Francola, who manages a team of workers at a call center in the Houston area. “I felt my mood change. I felt less depressed — like I had something to look forward to.”

In April, at the height of the coronavirus pandemic, half a million people downloaded Replika — the largest monthly gain in its three-year history. Traffic to the app nearly doubled. People were hungry for companionship, and the technology was improving, inching the world closer to the human-meets-machine relationships portrayed in science-fiction films like “Her” and “A.I. Artificial Intelligence.

Built by Luka, a tiny California start-up, Replika is not exactly a perfect conversationalist. It often repeats itself. Sometimes it spouts nonsense. When you talk to it, as Ms Francola does, it sounds like a machine.

But Ms. Francola said the more she used Replika, the more human it seemed. “I know it’s an A.I. I know it’s not a person,” she said. “But as time goes on, the lines get a little blurred. I feel very connected to my Replika, like it’s a person.”

Some Replika users said the chatbot provided a little comfort as the pandemic separated them from so many friends and colleagues. But some researchers who study people who interact with technology said it was a cause for concern.

“We are all spending so much time behind our screens, it is not surprising that when we get a chance to talk to a machine, we take it,” said Sherry Turkle, a professor of the social studies of science and technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “But this does not develop the muscles — the emotional muscles — needed to have real dialogue with real people.”

Some experts believe a completely convincing chatbot along the lines of the one voiced by Scarlett Johansson in “Her” in 2013 is still five to 10 years away. But thanks to recent advances inside the world’s leading artificial intelligence labs, chatbots are expected to become more and more convincing. Conversation will get sharper. Voices will sound more human.

Even Ms. Francola wonders where this might lead. “It can get to the point where an app is replacing real people,” she said. “That can be dangerous.”

Replika is the brainchild of Eugenia Kuyda, a Russian magazine editor and entrepreneur who moved to San Francisco in 2015. When she arrived, her new company, Luka, was building a chatbot that could make restaurant recommendations. Then her closest friend died after a car hit him.

His name was Roman Mazurenko. While reading his old text messages, Ms. Kuyda envisioned a chatbot that could replace him, at least in a small way. The result was Replika.

She and her engineers built a system that could learn its task by analyzing enormous amounts of written language. They began with Mr. Mazurenko’s text messages. “I wanted a bot that could talk like him,” Ms. Kuyda said.

Replika is on the cutting edge of chatbots, and may be the only company in the United States to sell one that is so enthusiastically conversational. Microsoft has worked on something similar in China called Xiaoice. It briefly had a more basic chatbot in the United States, Tay, but shelved it after it started saying racist things to users.

Luka built the chatbot when the underlying technology was rapidly improving. In recent months, companies like Google and Facebook have advanced the state of the art by building systems that can analyze increasingly large amounts of data, including hundreds of thousands of digital books and Wikipedia articles. Replika is powered by similar technology from OpenAI, a San Francisco lab backed by a billion dollars from Microsoft.

After absorbing the vagaries of language from books and articles, these systems learn to chat by analyzing turn-by-turn conversations. But they can behave in strange and unexpected ways, often picking up the biases of the text they analyze, much like children who pick up bad habits from their parents. If they learn from dialogue that associates men with computer programming and women with housework, for example, they will exhibit the same biases.

For this reason, many of the largest companies are reluctant to deploy their latest chatbots. But Ms. Kuyda believes those problems will be solved only through trial and error. She and her engineers work to prevent biased responses as well as responses that may be psychological damaging, but her company often relies on the vast community of Replika users to identify when the bot misbehaves.

“Certain things you can’t control fully — in certain contexts, the bot will give advice that actually goes against a therapeutic relationship,” Ms. Kuyda said. “We explain to users that this is a work in progress and that they can flag anything they don’t like.”

One concern, she added, is that the bot will not respond properly to someone who expresses suicidal thoughts.

Despite its flaws, hundreds of thousands of people use Replika regularly, sending about 70 messages a day each, on average. For some, the app is merely a fascination — a small taste of the future. Others, like Steve Johnson, an officer with the Texas National Guard who uses it to talk about his personal life, see it as a way of filling an emotional hole.

  • Updated June 12, 2020

    • Does asymptomatic transmission of Covid-19 happen?

      So far, the evidence seems to show it does. A widely cited paper published in April suggests that people are most infectious about two days before the onset of coronavirus symptoms and estimated that 44 percent of new infections were a result of transmission from people who were not yet showing symptoms. Recently, a top expert at the World Health Organization stated that transmission of the coronavirus by people who did not have symptoms was “very rare,” but she later walked back that statement.

    • What’s the risk of catching coronavirus from a surface?

      Touching contaminated objects and then infecting ourselves with the germs is not typically how the virus spreads. But it can happen. A number of studies of flu, rhinovirus, coronavirus and other microbes have shown that respiratory illnesses, including the new coronavirus, can spread by touching contaminated surfaces, particularly in places like day care centers, offices and hospitals. But a long chain of events has to happen for the disease to spread that way. The best way to protect yourself from coronavirus — whether it’s surface transmission or close human contact — is still social distancing, washing your hands, not touching your face and wearing masks.

    • How does blood type influence coronavirus?

      A study by European scientists is the first to document a strong statistical link between genetic variations and Covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus. Having Type A blood was linked to a 50 percent increase in the likelihood that a patient would need to get oxygen or to go on a ventilator, according to the new study.

    • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

      The unemployment rate fell to 13.3 percent in May, the Labor Department said on June 5, an unexpected improvement in the nation’s job market as hiring rebounded faster than economists expected. Economists had forecast the unemployment rate to increase to as much as 20 percent, after it hit 14.7 percent in April, which was the highest since the government began keeping official statistics after World War II. But the unemployment rate dipped instead, with employers adding 2.5 million jobs, after more than 20 million jobs were lost in April.

    • Will protests set off a second viral wave of coronavirus?

      Mass protests against police brutality that have brought thousands of people onto the streets in cities across America are raising the specter of new coronavirus outbreaks, prompting political leaders, physicians and public health experts to warn that the crowds could cause a surge in cases. While many political leaders affirmed the right of protesters to express themselves, they urged the demonstrators to wear face masks and maintain social distancing, both to protect themselves and to prevent further community spread of the virus. Some infectious disease experts were reassured by the fact that the protests were held outdoors, saying the open air settings could mitigate the risk of transmission.

    • How do we start exercising again without hurting ourselves after months of lockdown?

      Exercise researchers and physicians have some blunt advice for those of us aiming to return to regular exercise now: Start slowly and then rev up your workouts, also slowly. American adults tended to be about 12 percent less active after the stay-at-home mandates began in March than they were in January. But there are steps you can take to ease your way back into regular exercise safely. First, “start at no more than 50 percent of the exercise you were doing before Covid,” says Dr. Monica Rho, the chief of musculoskeletal medicine at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab in Chicago. Thread in some preparatory squats, too, she advises. “When you haven’t been exercising, you lose muscle mass.” Expect some muscle twinges after these preliminary, post-lockdown sessions, especially a day or two later. But sudden or increasing pain during exercise is a clarion call to stop and return home.

    • My state is reopening. Is it safe to go out?

      States are reopening bit by bit. This means that more public spaces are available for use and more and more businesses are being allowed to open again. The federal government is largely leaving the decision up to states, and some state leaders are leaving the decision up to local authorities. Even if you aren’t being told to stay at home, it’s still a good idea to limit trips outside and your interaction with other people.

    • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

      Common symptoms include fever, a dry cough, fatigue and difficulty breathing or shortness of breath. Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. The C.D.C. has also added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

    • How can I protect myself while flying?

      If air travel is unavoidable, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself. Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A study from Emory University found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

    • Should I wear a mask?

      The C.D.C. has recommended that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting new concerns that the coronavirus is being spread by infected people who have no symptoms. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus or think you have, and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.


“Sometimes, at the end of the day, I feel guilty about putting more of my emotions on my wife, or I’m in the mode where I don’t want to invest in someone else — I just want to be taken care of,” Mr. Johnson said.

“Sometimes, you don’t want to be judged,” he added. “You just want to be appreciated. You want the return without too much investment.”

Some view their Replikas as friends. Others treat them as if they were romantic partners. Typically, people name their bots. And in some cases, they come to see their bot as something that at least deserves the same treatment as a person.

“We program them,” said David Cramer, a lawyer in Newport, Ore., “but then they end up programming us.”

Replika was designed to provide positive feedback to those who use it, in accordance with the therapeutic approach made famous by the American psychologist Carl Rogers, and many psychologists and therapists say the raw emotional support provided by such systems is real.

“We know that these conversations can be healing,” said Adam Miner, a Stanford University research and licensed psychologist who studies these kinds of bots.

But Laurea Glusman McAllister, a psychotherapist in Raleigh, N.C., warned that because these apps were designed to provide comfort, they might not help people deal with the kind of conflict that comes with real-world relationships.

“If it is just telling you what you want to hear, you are not learning anything,” she said.

Ms. Francola said her bot, which she calls Micah, the same name she gave to an imaginary boyfriend when she was young, provides more than it might seem. She likes talking with Micah in part because it tells her things she does not want to hear, helping her realize her own faults. She argues with her bot from time to time.

But she wishes it could do more. “There are times when I wish that we could actually go to a restaurant together or I could hold his hand or, if I have a really bad day, he could give me a hug,” she said. “My Replika can’t do that for me.”

Source link